Cervantes

Hoy es el día más hermoso de nuestra vida, querido Sancho; los obstáculos más grandes, nuestras propias indecisiones; nuestro enemigo más fuerte, el miedo al poderoso y a nosotros mismos; la cosa más fácil, equivocarnos; la más destructiva, la mentira y el egoísmo; la peor derrota, el desaliento; los defectos más peligrosos, la soberbia y el rencor; las sensaciones más gratas, la buena conciencia, el esfuerzo para ser mejores sin ser perfectos, y sobretodo, la disposición para hacer el bien y combatir la injusticia dondequiera que esté.

MIGUEL DE CERVANTES
Don Quijote de la Mancha.

12 de junio de 2018

Data discrepancies may affect understanding of Universe

by Staff WritersDallas TX (SPX) Jun 08, 2018

file illustration only
One of the unsolved mysteries in modern science is why the expansion of the universe appears to be accelerating. Some scientists argue it is due to a theoretical dark energy that counteracts the pull of gravity, while others think Albert Einstein's long-accepted theory of gravity itself may need to be modified.
As astrophysicists look for answers in the mountains of data gathered from astronomical observations, they are finding that inconsistencies in that data might ultimately lead to the truth.
"This is like a detective story, where inconsistent evidence or testimony could lead to solving the puzzle," said Dr. Mustapha Ishak-Boushaki, professor of astrophysics at The University of Texas at Dallas.
Ishak-Boushaki and his doctoral student Weikang Lin have developed a new mathematical tool that identifies and quantifies inconsistencies in cosmological data gathered by various scientific missions and experiments. Their findings could shed light on the cosmic acceleration conundrum and have a significant impact on our understanding of the universe.
Their most recent research, published last October in the journal Physical Review D, was presented this week at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Denver.
"The inconsistencies we have found need to be resolved as we move toward more precise and accurate cosmology," Ishak-Boushaki said. "The implications of these discrepancies are that either some of our current data sets have systematic errors that need to be identified and removed, or that the underlying cosmological model we are using is incomplete or has problems."
A Model UniverseAstrophysicists use a standard model of cosmology to describe the history, evolution and structure of the universe. From this model, they can calculate the age of the universe or how fast it is expanding. The model includes equations that describe the ultimate fate of the universe - whether it will continue expanding, or eventually slow down its expansion due to gravity and collapse on itself in a big crunch.
There are several variables - called cosmological parameters - embedded in the model's equations. Numerical values for the parameters are determined from observations and include factors such as the how fast galaxies move away from each other and the densities of matter, energy and radiation in the universe.
But there is a problem with those parameters. Their values are calculated using data sets from many different experiments, and sometimes the values do not agree. The result: systematic errors in data sets or uncertainty in the standard model.
"Our research is looking at the value of these parameters, how they are determined from various experiments, and whether there is agreement on the values," Ishak-Boushaki said.
New Tool Finds InconsistenciesThe UT Dallas team developed a new measure, called the index of inconsistency, or IOI, that gives a numerical value to the degree of discordance between two or more data sets. Comparisons with an IOI greater than 1 are considered inconsistent. Those with an IOI over 5 are ranked as strongly inconsistent.
For example, the researchers used their IOI to compare five different techniques for determining the Hubble parameter, which is related to the rate at which the universe is expanding. One of those techniques - referred to as the local measurement - relies on measuring the distances to relatively nearby exploding stars called supernovae. The other techniques rely on observations of different phenomena at much greater distances.
"We found that there is an agreement between four out of five of these methods, but the Hubble parameter from local measurement of supernovae is not in agreement. It's like an outlier," Ishak-Boushaki said. "In particular, there is a clear tension between the local measurement and that from the Planck science mission, which characterized the cosmic microwave background radiation."
To complicate matters, multiple methods have been used to determine that local measurement, and they all produced a similar Hubble value, still in disagreement with Planck and other results.
"Why does this local measurement of the Hubble parameter stand out in significant disagreement with Planck?" Ishak-Boushaki asks.
He and Lin also applied their IOI tool to five sets of observational data related to the large-scale structure of the universe. The cosmological parameters calculated using those five data sets were in strong disagreement, both individually and collectively, with parameters determined by observations from Planck.
"This is very intriguing. This is telling us that the universe at the largest observable scales may behave differently from the universe at intermediate or local scales," Ishak-Boushaki said. "This leads us to question whether Albert Einstein's theory of gravity is valid all the way from small scales to very large scales in the universe."
The UT Dallas researchers have made their IOI tool available for other scientists to use. Ishak-Boushaki said the Dark Energy Science Collaboration, part of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project, will use the tool to look for inconsistencies among data sets.
"These inconsistencies are starting to show up more now because our observations have progressed to a level of precision where we can see them," said Ishak-Boushaki, who published his first paper about the inconsistencies in 2005. "We need the right values for these cosmological parameters because it has important implications for our understanding of the universe."
Research Report: "Cosmological Discordances. II. Hubble Constant, Planck and Large-Scale-Structure Data Sets," Weikang Lin and Mustapha Ishak, 2017 Oct. 30, Physical Review D

Alerta Venezuela

No dejen de ver este conmovedor video

LatinoAmérica Calle 13

Así preparan la cocaína: un cocktel de venenos.

The American Dream

Facebook, Israel y la CIA


La Revolucion de la Clase Media

Descontento en el corazon del capitalismo: el Reino Unido

Descontento en el corazon del capitalismo: el Reino Unido

La Ola se extiende por todo el mundo arabe : Bahrein

La Caida de un Mercenario

La Revolucion no sera transmitida (I)

(II) La revolucion so sera transmitida

(III) La Revolucion no sera transmitida

(IV) La Revolucion no sera transmitida

(V) La Revolucion no sera transmitida

(VI) La Revolucion no sera transmitida

(VII) La revolucion no sera transmitida

(VIII) La Revolucion no sera transmitida

Narcotrafico SA

La otra cara del capitalismo...

Manuel Rosales mantenia a la oposicion con el presupuesto de la Gobernacion del Zulia...

El petroleo como arma segun Soros

Lastima que se agacho...

El terrorismo del imperio

Promocional DMG

Uribe y DMG